Collaborators

Professor Kamaldeep Bhui Professor of Cultural Psychiatry and Epidemiology; Hon Consultant Psychiatrist. I research socio-cultural risk factors and protective factors, and risks that generate inequalities in population mental health and suicide. I deploy novel anthropological, sociological and epidemiological research methods to optimise care quality, safety and access to assessment and treatment, and public health; for example, the new cultural consultation service (CCS) evalutes narrative and clinical data. My research studies include adolescent and adult populations, with a recent award (CI) to develop new screening tools for dementia in South Asians; PI investigations include studies of chronic fatigue, adolescent self-harm, detention in hospital, housing, discrimination, cultural identity, religiosity, depression, suicide, violence, radicalisation and terrorism, and complex interventions (e.g. CCS and narrative based). Collaborations include work on ethnicity and Hepatitis C, Diabetes, Cancer, urban regeneration, and arts in health. The CCS and MSc Psychological Therapies provide pathways to Improving Access to Effective Therapies, by improving the quality of assessment and treatment as well as  access. Overall, my academic work contributes to prevention, reducing inequalities, building capacity, engaging the public, and addressing stigma to improve outcomes.
Homepage: http://www.wolfson.qmul.ac.uk/psychiatry/staff/bhui_k.htm

Simon Dein is an Honorary Professor at Durham University, Senior Lecturer at UCL and Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist in Essex. He is interested in religion and health and has written extensively on religious experience and psychopathology. His current research interests include the mental health of Bengalis in London, Jewish millennialism among Hasidic Jews and Evangelical Christian Religious experience. He is contributing to an MSc in Spirituality, Theology and Health at Durham University.
Homepage: https://iris.ucl.ac.uk/research/personal?upi=SDEIN26

Dr Glòria Durà-Vilà, MD, MRCPsych, MSc, is a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist in Surrey and Borders NHS Foundation Trust, and a Visiting Lecturer at the Department of Mental Health Sciences, University College London. She was previously Clinical Lecturer at Imperial College London. Her research interests focus on medical anthropology and cultural psychiatry including religion and psychiatry, medicalisation of sadness, idioms and narratives of distress, intellectual disability and personal identity theory. In the area of religion and mental health, she has recently conducted several research projects exploring how intense sadness is understood and resolved in monastic contemplative settings, as well as investigating the connection between clergy and psychiatrists in terms of the conceptualisation and management of mental health problems.

Stefan Ecks, MA, DEA, PhD, is Director of the Medical Anthropology Programme and Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh. He has carried out ethnographic fieldwork on health and medicine in India since 1999, focusing on postcolonial notions of body, health and healing. His current work looks at emerging forms of psychopharmaceutical uses, evidence-based medicine, and global corporate citizenship in South Asia. Previously he has been assistant professor at the South Asia Institute, University of Heidelberg (2001-2004) and held visiting fellowships at the University of California at Berkeley and the Karl Jaspers Centre for Advanced Transcultural Studies at Heidelberg.
Homepage: http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/staff/social_anthropology/ecks_stefan

Dr Chris Harding is Lecturer in Asian History at the University of Edinburgh, specializing in modern Indian and Japanese history and in the transnational history of ideas. His research explores the ways that religion and mental health have become increasingly intertwined since the late nineteenth century: in the pioneering of new psychiatric paradigms and forms of therapy that draw upon religious ideas and practices from across Asia and the West, and in the emergence of psychologically-informed theologies and religious sub-cultures.
Research homepage: http://www.ReligionAndMentalHealth.co.uk
Blog: http://www.TheBoredomProject.com

Dr Cheryl McGeachan is a Teaching Fellow in Human Geography, in the School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow. She is interested in exploring the relationships between individual experiences of mental illness, on a variety of scales, and their real and imagined geographies. She is author of the recently completed PhD thesis, Enticing Ghosts to Life: Exploring the Historical and Cultural Geographies of R.D. Laing (2010).
Homepage: http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/ges/staff/cherylmcgeachan/

Dr Gavin Miller (PI). Gavin is Senior Lecturer in Medical Humanities, in the School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow. He is particularly interested in the history, culture and philosophy of the “psy-disciplines”, and their often unacknowledged overlap with other areas of life and culture. He was recently involved in the AHRC/ESRC-funded Theology and Therapy Project, which investigated the overlap of psychotherapy, Christianity, and new discourses of “spirituality” in post-war Scotland and England.
Homepage: http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/critical/staff/gavinmiller/

Dr Matthew Smith. Matt is a lecturer and Wellcome Trust research fellow at the University of Strathclyde’s Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. He is interested in the notion of mental illness as a universal and essential biological phenomenon and is keen to explore instances in which national and regional political, social, economic and environmental circumstances have challenged conventional notions of mental health. Most recently he has investigated how understandings of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) have varied across time and place.
Homepage: http://www.mattsmithbooks.com/wp/

Tim Thornton is Professor of Philosophy and Mental Health, School of Health, University of Central Lancashire. His research concerns conceptual issues in mental healthcare, psychiatry and medicine including the validity of psychiatric diagnosis, whether values play an irreducible role in illness concepts and the implications of this for the objectivity, or not, of psychiatric diagnosis. He is author of Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry (OUP 2007) and co-author of the Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry (OUP 2006).
Homepage: http://www.uclan.ac.uk/schools/school_of_health/tim_thornton.php
Publications: https://sites.google.com/site/drtimthornton/Home
Blog: http://inthespaceofreasons.blogspot.com/

Dr Ross White is a University Teacher in Mental Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow. His research interests include the application of acceptance-based approaches for helping to reduce distress associated with the experience of psychosis. Dr White has a particular interest in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). He is coordinator of an MSc programme in Global Mental Health that investigates how mental illness presents in low and middle income countries and explores culturally appropriate treatments for mental illness in these countries. Dr White also has an honorary contract as a Clinical Psychologist working with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.
Homepage: http://www.gla.ac.uk/researchinstitutes/healthwellbeing/staff/rosswhite/

Dr Angela Woods is Lecturer in Medical Humanities at Durham University’s Centre for Medical Humanities. She is interested in the relationship between theoretical and subjective accounts of psychotic experience, narrative identity, and the emerging field of critical neuroscience. Angela is currently involved in two large interdisciplinary projects: “Emotional Experience in Depression: A Philosophical Study” and “Hearing the Voice.”
University Page: http://www.dur.ac.uk/school.health/staff/?username=vzjh71
Homepage: http://en.gravatar.com/amwdurham

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